Blog Entry

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

Posted on: July 13, 2010 4:13 pm
 
I disagree with those who say that Yankee Owner George Steinbrenner was to blame for the (seemingly) out of control baseball salaries today. Baseball players are entertainers and unlike many actors or these reality 'celebrities', they have to work a hell of a lot harder than everyone else. Why is it okay for Rock Stars and Actors to make millions on a single film, but it's too much money for a ballplayer to receive? A professional ball player has to possess a hell of a lot more talent to throw 90+ MPH, hit a 90+ MPH fastball or a hellacious breaking pitch, to run swiftly on the base paths and field their position with grace, and most of all to play a STAGGERING 162 game schedule when they are largely away from their families and missing their own childrens little league games.

God Bless Curt Flood for having the courage to fight for free agency and to George Steinbrenner for finally giving ball players their due. I just wish that the more recent generation of ball players were more appreciative of the sacrifice that the players from our parents and grand parents generations had made.  And I'm not talking about verbal appreciation; I'm talking about financial assistance to help those who weren't fortunate enough to play in the post-free agency era.

I don't think we should be judging salaries today as being too high, when compared to a time when the players were clearly being cheated by the Owners who were monopolizing the game and profits. Some salaries might be too high because teams or GM's like everyone else in life, can make mistakes in evaluating talent (see Oliver Perez or Luis Castillo on the Mets ; Kei Igawa on the Yankees).

As for George Steinbrenner, I didn't care for him much when he was firing managers (especially Billy Martin) and making jokes about it. I didn't like the fact that he wouldn't show any patience in building up the Yankee farm system. However, as you get older and you realize that most baseball fans haven't enjoyed the great success that the Yankee fans have experienced, you appreciate the DESIRE and PASSION that George Steinbrenner had for WINNING. Competition is all about wanting to win. What good would it be if your Owner didn't care about winning? You'd have the Kansas City Royals and Pittsburgh Pirates over the past two decades. I think it's a disgrace that certain teams are POCKETING THE LUXURY TAX MONEY and NOT putting it back into their franchises (see Florida, despite their two World Series wins).  George Steinbrenner put his money where his mouth was. And yes, oddly enough it took some humbling of George (Howie Spiro incident with Dave Winfield) to give Gene 'Stick' Michael ample time to build the Yankee Championship core;  but when you combined Michael's farm system and trade acquisitions with George's free agent money and desire to win, it created a new Baseball Dynasty in the Yankees storied history. This Michael core of Mariano Rivera , Derek Jeter , Andy Pettitte and Jorge Posada , are still contributing today defending their 2009 World Series Title.

If you want a fan base that would really appreciate George Steinbrenner, just talk to any Chicago Cubs fan. They would understand. The Mets fans understand these past few years, more than they'd care to admit.

George Steinbrenner was often loud and sometimes abrassive, but like him or not, George demanded from his NY Yankee teams the same thing all fans want from their own; Championships. As a very fortunate NY Yankee fan, all I can say today is 'Thank you George Steinbrenner'.


Category: MLB
Comments

Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: July 16, 2010 4:41 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

Also, you are dead wrong on all the players mentioned above as they were salary dumps for the teams selling or trading them...if not,why would they make deals with the devil?
The players weren't making that much money back then! Free Agency only started in 1976.  Those teams were exchanging veterans in their prime (in most cases) for a bevy of young prospects.

Today, you can't even get a few good, young prospects for a veteran players, unless that veteran is under team control for a few more years. In most cases, the team with the veteran (like Roy Oswalt), is forced to EAT large portions of the veterans salary or else they won't get any worthwhile prospects back or worse, the deal won't happen at all.

You can't have salary dumps in 1973 when there really were no unaffordable salaries. It was a veteran for prospects, period.












Since: Jan 6, 2010
Posted on: July 16, 2010 4:25 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

George Steinbrenner's legacy is putting his own money from his family's Ship Building enterprise into the Yankees, restoring a storied but moribound franchise to its former glory in just three years, creating the most copied model for modern sports franchises with his local YES Network set up, thus turning the Yankees, worth a few million when he bought it, into the most valuable sports franchise on the planet, at an estimated $1.2 billion.

Say what you want about the guy but it was for the money potential the NY market affords that make the Yankees worth more than spit.  Ask Steinbrunner if he or the organization would permit the Royals to build a stadium in Brooklyn, the Pirates in Yonkers, and the Brewers in Newark. If that happened then, and only then, the playing field would be even for chances to grab the mega media bucks available.

Also, you are dead wrong on all the players mentioned above as they were salary dumps for the teams selling or trading them...if not,why would they make deals with the devil?



Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: July 16, 2010 1:27 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.


Wow, you're so wrong on this one. If New York is such a money maker as you suggest, then CBS should have sold the Yankees for a hell of a lot more than a few million back in the early 70's. But they didn't. The Yankees had sucked for quite some time when Steinbrenner took over. But the men he put in control, especially Team President Gabe Paul, did a great job rebuilding this team through trades.

Gabe Paul acquired, through trades: , , and from the Indians; from the ; and from the ; , and from the ; and from the . None of these were big money salary dumps, like an A-Rod from Texas in 2004.

The Yankees were already a A.L. Pennant winning team in 76' (lost series to Big Red Machine) when big time free agents Reggie Jackson and Catfish Hunter arrived. Those two helped put the Yankees over the top and they won two World Series over the Dodgers in 77' and 78'.

When Gabe Paul left after the 1977' Title, Steinbrenner a few years later signed Dave Winfield, lost the Series to the Dodgers in 81' and then we had a long period of mediocrity due to bad trades and no pitching. Ricky Henderson was another big money signing during the 80's.

I just think the idea of buying Championships is highly overrated. The Gene Stick Michael farm system was the key behind the late 90's run, as I illustrated above.

George Steinbrenner's legacy is putting his own money from his family's Ship Building enterprise into the Yankees, restoring a storied but moribound franchise to its former glory in just three years, creating the most copied model for modern sports franchises with his local YES Network set up, thus turning the Yankees, worth a few million when he bought it, into the most valuable sports franchise on the planet, at an estimated $1.2 billion.

I also assure you, that George Steinbrenner was an Ohio guy, and had George Steinbrenner been owner of the Cleveland Indians or Browns, they'd have a recent Championship or two or three.

Just because New York has a larger poplulation, we also have more competition immediately around us. There is no reason with the rabid fans in the mid west, that you can't build a juggernaut that feeds itself. That includes Kansas City. I don't see St.Louis complaining about competition. Now why is that? Aren't they both from the same State?







Since: Jan 6, 2010
Posted on: July 16, 2010 11:31 am
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

Steinbrunner a great baseball and management genius...I think not.  If he owned the Royals, Brewers, or the Pirates he would have been out of baseball decades ago.  Any success achieved has come solely from operating in the most lucrative market in the world and all he did was cash in for himself and bought pennants for the fans.  In other words he had the benefit, like our stupid government, to print money or at least grab same at will.

If he had any competition in NY he may or may not have survived...depending on what piece of the whole pie he to give up.

If he operated in KC...bankruptcy at best.



Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: July 15, 2010 8:27 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.


When the Yankees did a poor job of drafting for the farm system after Stick Michael's imprint faded, then George (with Cashman as his puppet) TRIED to buy a few more Titles with Jason Giambi, Gary Sheffield, Mike Mussina among others; but it didn't work. We lost in 2001 to Arizona with Giambi and Mussina in the fold. We lost again in 2003 to Florida with Sheffield added in. A-Rod was a salary dump by Texas, but we still had to give up All Star 2B Alfonso Soriano coming off a horrible World Series showing. That didn't work because Cashman had never replaced the pitchers.

Then last off season, Brian Cashman did admittedly PURCHASE A CHAMPIONSHIP by signing C.C. Sabathia, A.J. Burnett and Mark Teixeira in ONE off season. Plus he did it when every other team was getting MAULED in ticket sales because of the recession.

2009 was a bought. I'll give you guys that. This is why the NFL, to me, is the most competitive sport. The Lions and Cleveland have no excuse. Every team should have the ability to do well. It's as level a playing field, as you're going to get.






Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: July 15, 2010 8:20 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.


I respectfully disagree. Baseball players salaries are what the free market bears. When the economy crashed in 2008, you saw the effect on the slightly above average players like Bobby Abreu getting very little from the Angels. Even this past year you saw Johnny Damon, begging for a contract from anybody. Jermaine Dye decided to retire because nobody would give him at least $6 million.

I think because of the bad recession, you're starting to see the likely result compared with the good times. The elite players will still get their money, but the next tier have to take a lot less than they had gotten used to.

When George Steinbrenner gave contracts to Reggie Jackson and Dave Winfield, those were mega deals at the time; but in retrospect, those guys (especially Reggie) were well worth their money in marketing dollars alone. George Steinbrenner understood this. Not his fault that the other teams Owners did not.




Since: Mar 21, 2010
Posted on: July 15, 2010 7:58 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

he did have a major impact on baseball....a NEGATIVE one! he has almost single handedly ruined baseball with allof his shenanigans ,buying of players etc.If you are a Yankees fan then he was great,fantastic and all the above.But outside of the Ynk's and all the front runners out there.He was horrible,loudmouthed,greedy and anything else negative you can think of including helping keep their team down and out,referring to salaries and buying of players.I for one am glad he has finally died, as wrong as it is but this guy was a scumbag and was lucky to have lived this long 



Since: Aug 25, 2006
Posted on: July 15, 2010 4:36 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

Fantastic response.  I think my gripe stems from the lack of salary cap and the ballooned payrolls of the 21st century.  I'm not one to try and take away anyone else's team glory, etc.  I just loved to cheer for the cubs to put it all together, but watching Hendry and Co. just throw piles of money all over to place so foolishly, it just cheapens the whole experience from me. I will give Steinbrenner the credit for having the money, and openly investing in his product vs. lining his pockets. Unfortunately the eventual response is that teams will need to follow suit to keep their markets happy. I'm just not a fan of this product.



Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: July 15, 2010 4:20 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

Make a game actually fathomable for a family of four to go to.  If the average middle income family can't do that comfortably, you've lost you way IMO.
I think we've reached the breaking point in terms of how much families can afford to pay. Look at the NY Giants and NY Jets in the NFL, selling these Personal Seat Licences (aka PSL's) to their new stadium, which only gives you THE RIGHT to buy your season tickets. You can later sell the PSL to someone else, as opposed to giving up your seats for nothing. Or in the case of the potential future buyer of a PSL; it beats waiting in a multi year long line. The Giants sold their PSL's because the team has a larger fan base and is an older, more reputable franchise. The Jets are having trouble selling all of their PSL's, and there has been talk of NY are blackouts this season. That's unheard of for New York.

As for MLB, the Yankees created these ridiculously priced box seats in back of home plate and both dugouts. Many Yankee games last year showed empty seats on TV, because those are the $5,000 PER SEAT boxes. A family of four would pay $20,000 just for those seats for ONE GAME! They cut the price in half later in the year, but for those who already paid, they just gave them a 2 for 1 on the seats they bought already at the higher prices. This year, those seats are still empty. What they'll do to fill those seats on Nationally televised games, is offer those $2.5K seats to our Armed Services personel for $50 bucks or something like that. But they have to wear their uniform because they want credit for doing that.


Respectfully disagree. I'm a cubs fan. Talk to me. I sure don't appreciate or understand George Steinbrenner.

The Yankee teams that won in 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000 were not bought by any stretch of the imagination. Gene Stick Michael built those teams, while George was banned, around a philosophy of hitters who work the count and get into opposing teams bullpens early. While building a strong starting staff with a super strong bullpen. He did it.

Look at the main players involved on those teams, where were the big money free agent signings?

Catcher: Posada (farm system), Giardi (low cost signing)
First Base: Tino Martinez (trade with Seattle)
Second Base: Pat Kelly (farm system), Mariano Duncan (low cost signing), Chuck Knolblauch (trade with Twins), Alfonso Soriano (farm system)
Third Base: Wade Boggs (moderate cost signing, near end of career), Charlie Hayes (low cost signing), Scott Brosius (trade with A's)
Shortstop: Derek Jeter (farm system)
Left Field: Jim Leyritz (farm system), Tim Raines (minor signing, near end of career), David Justice (moderate acquisition for 2000 only)
Center Field: Bernie Williams (farm system)
Right Field: Paul O'Neill (trade with Reds)
DH: Chili Davis (minor signing, near end of career), Daryl Strawberry (minor signing, near end of career)

Starters: Jimmy Key (Major signing but only for 96' team), Andy Pettitte (farm system), David Cone (trade with Blue Jays), David Wells (moderate signing, many teams didn't want his baggage), Doc Gooden (minor signing, near end of career), Roger Clemens (trade with Blue Jays, had to give up David Wells) El Duque (moderate signing from Cuba), Scott Kamenicki (farm system), Ted Lilly (farm system)

Bullpen: Mariano Rivera (farm system), Jeff Nelson (trade with Seattle), Mike Stanton (moderate signing from Atlanta), Ramiro Mendoza (farm system), Bob Wickman (farm system), Graehme Lloyd (minor signing), David Weathers (farm system)


Bottom Line: Jimmy Key was a major signing even though he was older, but was only a part of 96' Championship. Same thing for Wade Boggs. That's it on the big signings. There were NO C.C. Sabathia or Mark Teixeira or A.J. Burnett signings here! Roger Clemens was a big $ acquisition from the Blue Jays, but the Yankees had to give up their prior years best pitcher (David Wells) to get him in a trade.

They used their deep farm system to acquire Paul O'Neill (Roberto Kelly), Tino Martinez and Jeff Nelson (Russ Davis, Sterling Hitchcock), Chuck Knolblauch (Eric Milton, Christian Guzman, two other prospects), David Cone (cost three prospects), Roger Clemens (David Wells plus prospects)


Scott Brosius was acquired for veteran Kenny Rogers.


This is how the Yankees won four World Series in five years. It all started with Stick Michael's farm system, and then some smart trades and some prudent free agent spending.  You can talk payroll all you want, but the Yankees had to pay these guys to keep them. In paying these guys millions, they were only a victim of their own success.






























 









Since: Aug 25, 2006
Posted on: July 15, 2010 2:45 pm
 

George Steinbrenner impact on MLB.

Respectfully disagree. I'm a cubs fan. Talk to me. I sure don't appreciate or understand George Steinbrenner.

I suppose I understand him, only of the last few years when cubs management has started breaking the bank to try and buy a winner.  Fact of the matter is I hate that. I would take another 100 years of losing with all teams on a salary capped equal playing field, vs. having teams that have a 26 man roster that costs the same as 2 players from another team.

Baseball has actually been cheapened for me watching the cubs try their hardest to buy a title.  It's better than wrigley's cash cow pocket lining, but I just can't help but equate it to buying a prostitute vs. finding true love.  Make a game actually fathomable for a family of four to go to.  If the average middle income family can't do that comfortably, you've lost you way IMO.

I know nothing of Steinbrenner personally, obv RIP. 


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